How To Still Make 2017 Your Standout Year

I think a lot about making this year better than the last.

But lately, something’s hit me. What about making the year better than – the next one, and the one after that, and so on? After all, if all we ever do is base our improvement on what’s already happened, then we’re severely limiting our perspective.

This year could be the year that changes your life forever. It could galvanize who you are in a way no other time has or will – in your lifetime.

Yet, none of that will happen if your perspective is based solely on improving on what you’ve already accomplished.

By comparing your year to what it was last year, it’s easy to make small changes. Instead of creating a revolution in the way you lead your life, you’re only likely to create a mere evolution.

–        Go to the gym a little more frequently
–        Pitch more clients and apply for more jobs to improve your salary
–        Spend more days out with your family

“If this was the best year of my life, what would have to happen?” ~ Brian Tracy.

Whatever the case may be, even if you decide to step things up by a huge amount, because you’re only using last year as your template for what this year could be, you’ll likely only improve by 5-50%.

But if you look beyond what you’ve already accomplished, you’ll be in a much more empowered position to reach your full potential.

Last year, for instance, I only wrote eleven articles on self-improvement. If i try to build on that, then I might only try to double that at most this year. But if I drop the model of linear growth, I can force myself to jump into a position that allows me to take a ‘quantum leap’.

Under this model, if I consider that I may be 10x as prolific in three years, there’s nothing stopping me from attempting it this year. And even if I don’t reach it, I’ll be better off by the end because I would have attempted to do more than I otherwise would have.

Introduce New Technologies into your Life

Archimedes once said: “Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world.”

With the aid of technology, you can make your goals easier to achieve. Whether it’s with a new laptop that allows you to accomplish your work faster, or something as simple as listening to the right music for your productivity.

The more you can introduce levers in your life, the easier building momentum will be.

You don’t always need to work harder to get more of what you want. Instead, consider and purchase the right physical and digital technologies -so that you move towards where you want to go, more easily.

Summary

Making progress based on what you’ve experienced last year is a step in the right direction. But looking at the past keeps you tunneled in. Looking into the future makes you think outside the box and act on outlandish possibilities.

Getting to where you want to go this year doesn’t have to be hard. Start comparing your present to your vision of the future – and make the necessary adjustments.

My Last Words

If you’re a creative and interested in learning how to upgrade the way you live your week, read my free guide on Spiritual Productivity.

  • You’ll learn about how to split up your day into four chunks, so you worry less about external influences.
  • You’ll discover the small hacks that will take your creative work on your PC to the next level. And much more…

 Samy Felice is a writer who is passionate about unique ideas related to living a meaningful life. His Free Guide explores ways people can make success easier.

POSTED  BY SAMY FELICE

Lack of sleep may dim positive thinking in those with anxiety, depression

University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) College of Medicine researchers have found that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (DACC) may have to work harder to modify negative emotional responses in people with poor sleep who have depression or anxiety. #POSITIVETHINKING #motivation #success #inspiration #happiness #happyman

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Be Kind To Yourself And Others

Kindness is a generosity of spirit. It comes to life when we give of ourselves and our time to be of help to others, without expecting anything in return. When you show kindness to somebody you bring out the best in yourself, and a side-effect of brightening up somebody else’s day is to feel happier in the moment yourself.

Pay attention to the impact your behaviour has on others, and notice your own feelings in association to their reactions. And think about how you feel yourself when somebody else shows you kindness. What you give comes back to you in even greater quantity. When you are kind, you not only get an immediate payback in terms of a feel-good factor, you will also receive kindness from others, and in completely unexpected and unrelated ways.

It is so easy to find ways to be kind to others: say something supportive when you instinctively feel someone needs to hear it; offer help without being asked for it; smile encouragingly; swallow your criticisms; listen without judgement; let mistakes slide instead of assigning blame; make small sacrifices for the benefit of somebody in greater need.

A great rule of thumb I apply to my life is to do unto others as I’d have them do unto me, and, do unto myself as I’d do unto others. The latter part is just as important as the first. It is no good to be consistently kind to others and forget to be so to yourself. You will run out of steam, and feel less able to show kindness to others if you don’t replenish your own mind, body and spirit on a regular basis.

Being kind to yourself means getting your needs met, being gentle with yourself instead of critical when you feel you’re not performing at your best, forgiving yourself when the need arises instead of beating yourself up. When you get into the habit of treating yourself with kindness, it becomes much easier to extend that consideration and behaviour to others.

Gratitude, thanks, paying forward, positive relationships, happiness

Just as I was leaving my office last night, I discovered THE most beautiful bouquet of flowers sitting beside my door awaiting me.
I was so taken back by the thoughtfulness of whomever had arranged this lovely gift, and when I opened the card and read that it was from my clients who participated in our 13-month Group Therapy for Women, I felt a profound sense of gratitude for them, and for the work that I have the privilege to do as a psychotherapist on a daily basis.

 

Both I, and the members of this group, felt that we’d come to a natural end to the sessions over the previous month, and last Wednesday was our final one. These wonderful women decided that they wanted me to know that they were thinking of me on the first Wednesday that we didn’t meet, and the action they took to show me that also reinforced what had been said the week before: that our work together over those many months had been very meaningful to each of them.

But, as I’ve said to them many times, it’d been equally meaningful to me both as their therapist, and as a human being. We all felt grateful for one another, indeed.

So, what I’m writing about today is gratitude, and its ability to help us maintain a wider perspective of our lives, especially when life is particularly challenging and, even when it feels downright disheartening.

Psychologist Shawn Achor, author of “The Happiness Advantage” and “Before Happiness”, and who is at the forefront of a relatively new movement in the field known as “positive psychology”, presents research data that supports the idea that taking just a few minutes each day to write down 3 things that you’re grateful for that day for a period of 21 days can actually change the way you view the world, and your life, in particular.

In other words, rather than just focusing on the negative aspects of your life, research suggests that over this period of time, you’ll begin to notice more of the positive ones. (The most important part of this exercise is that you need to identify 3 uniquely positive things for each day; they can’t be the same day after day, for example, “grateful for your good health”.

Instead, your list of 3 needs to be different each day, and in this way, the mind is ‘forced’ to seek out the positive aspects of the day that might’ve been casually overlooked due to a narrow, or habitual, focus on what’s wrong with your day.)

He argues that the purpose of this exercise is not to ignore or minimize the hardships one might be experiencing but, rather, it’s to bring a more balanced view of one’s life into perspective.

In doing so, we can avoid ‘Eeyore” syndrome, that is, a feeling that all is bleak (and it’ll likely remain that way), and will be able to see with greater clarity the things that perhaps need to change in our lives but also, and more importantly, as Achor suggests, we can see what exists that we can truly feel grateful for.

In the end, maybe a successful and happy life might be as simple as adopting an attitude of gratitude.

So, take the challenge, and see for yourself if you feel more positive about your life after 21 days of looking on the bright(er) side!

by SUZANNE ST. JOHN SMITH