Thinking Positively

Positive thinking will help you accomplish things that you never thought likely. Thinking big is the first step in realizing your dreams and meeting with success. Ideas and dreams are a good start, but will quickly fizzle without action. Below are some steps you can take to add positive thinking into your life. You will be amazed at how quickly things start happening when you do so.

* Take passionate action towards living your life by design. Talk is cheap. Action = deposits in the bank of a passionately authentic future. Without it, passion is negated.

* Commit to yourself as well as those you love to create forcefully a life you can love. Instead of reacting, commit to creating from your heart and soul, out of love rather than fear.

* Identify and embrace the idea that every moment is ideal despite of its ending. Every time you hit on something that may appear too excessive, why not give it a attempt and see if it will work.

* Dwell completely in a place of thankfulness. Learn to use what you have in your hands and make employ it in the most constructive way.
* Keep humor at the forefront of thought, laughing at and with yourself when possible. You may find yourself quite entertaining when you loosen up!

* Believe that you are the engineer of your fate. No one can take your passionate future from you except for you! Create your life genuinely. As long as there’s still breath in your body, there is no end to how much you can achieve in a lifetime.

Without having some positive thinking in your life-you’ll just end up as a dim bulb in a dark corner. Make your path and allow your inner light to shine brightly for the entire world to see.

Gratitude, thanks, paying forward, positive relationships, happiness

Just as I was leaving my office last night, I discovered THE most beautiful bouquet of flowers sitting beside my door awaiting me.
I was so taken back by the thoughtfulness of whomever had arranged this lovely gift, and when I opened the card and read that it was from my clients who participated in our 13-month Group Therapy for Women, I felt a profound sense of gratitude for them, and for the work that I have the privilege to do as a psychotherapist on a daily basis.

 

Both I, and the members of this group, felt that we’d come to a natural end to the sessions over the previous month, and last Wednesday was our final one. These wonderful women decided that they wanted me to know that they were thinking of me on the first Wednesday that we didn’t meet, and the action they took to show me that also reinforced what had been said the week before: that our work together over those many months had been very meaningful to each of them.

But, as I’ve said to them many times, it’d been equally meaningful to me both as their therapist, and as a human being. We all felt grateful for one another, indeed.

So, what I’m writing about today is gratitude, and its ability to help us maintain a wider perspective of our lives, especially when life is particularly challenging and, even when it feels downright disheartening.

Psychologist Shawn Achor, author of “The Happiness Advantage” and “Before Happiness”, and who is at the forefront of a relatively new movement in the field known as “positive psychology”, presents research data that supports the idea that taking just a few minutes each day to write down 3 things that you’re grateful for that day for a period of 21 days can actually change the way you view the world, and your life, in particular.

In other words, rather than just focusing on the negative aspects of your life, research suggests that over this period of time, you’ll begin to notice more of the positive ones. (The most important part of this exercise is that you need to identify 3 uniquely positive things for each day; they can’t be the same day after day, for example, “grateful for your good health”.

Instead, your list of 3 needs to be different each day, and in this way, the mind is ‘forced’ to seek out the positive aspects of the day that might’ve been casually overlooked due to a narrow, or habitual, focus on what’s wrong with your day.)

He argues that the purpose of this exercise is not to ignore or minimize the hardships one might be experiencing but, rather, it’s to bring a more balanced view of one’s life into perspective.

In doing so, we can avoid ‘Eeyore” syndrome, that is, a feeling that all is bleak (and it’ll likely remain that way), and will be able to see with greater clarity the things that perhaps need to change in our lives but also, and more importantly, as Achor suggests, we can see what exists that we can truly feel grateful for.

In the end, maybe a successful and happy life might be as simple as adopting an attitude of gratitude.

So, take the challenge, and see for yourself if you feel more positive about your life after 21 days of looking on the bright(er) side!

by SUZANNE ST. JOHN SMITH