Try C For The Big C

Because of its popularity and widespread use as a dietary supplement, Vitamin C may be more familiar to the general public than any other nutrient. Studies show that more than 40% of older Americans take Vitamin C supplements. In some regions of the country, almost 25% of all adults, regardless of age, take vitamin C. Outside of a multivitamin, vitamin C is also the most popular supplement among some groups of registered dietitians, and 80% of the dietitians who take vitamin C take more than 250 milligrams.

Vitamin C also called ascorbic acid, is a term that literally means “no scurvy.” Some 250 years ago, a British physician found that sailors given citrus fruits were cured of scurvy which is the result of a vitamin C deficiency. Dehydroascorbic acid and ascorbic acid are the active forms of vitamin C found in food. Most supplements contain only ascorbic acid. Levels of ascorbic acid in the blood rise to the same degree following the consumption of both vitamin C containing foods and ascorbic acid.

Because of its role in collagen formation and other life-sustaining functions, vitamin C serves as a key immune system nutrient and a potent free-radical fighter. This double-duty nutrient has been shown to prevent many illnesses, from everyday ailments such as the common cold to devastating diseases such as heart disease.

Physicians are often asked whether or not vitamin C is also an effective way of fighting cancer. While there is a growing body of scientific evidence to suggest that vitamin C is useful in the prevention of cancer, the jury is still out on its effectiveness as a cancer treatment. However, its low cost and astonishing lack of toxicity make it an extremely attractive candidate for further testing.

One of the current investigations underway regarding vitamin C’s role in the treatment of cancer is led by the Dr. Kedar Prasad, professor of radiology at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver. Prasad has demonstrated that vitamin C is capable of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells in vitro. He advocates giving vitamin C and other antioxidants to patients while they are undergoing conventional chemotherapy and radiation. Another team led by Dr. Mark Levine from the National Academy of Sciences studied vitamin C and cancer cells in a series of lab tests. Vitamin C appeared to boost production of hydrogen peroxide which killed cancer cells and left healthy cells unharmed. The levels of vitamin C were so high that they could only be achieved through IV infusions. These findings give plausibility to IV ascorbic acid in cancer treatment, and have unexpected implications for treatment of infections where hydrogen peroxide may be beneficial.

Cancer experts said the “overwhelming” evidence still suggested vitamin C was not an effective treatment. Studies during the ’70s first suggested the administration of high doses of vitamin C could help treat cancer, but later research did not back this up. There are many substances that have been shown to kill cancer cells in the lab but failed to fulfill that promise when tested in people says Henry Scowcroft of UK-based Cancer Research, Inc. In the latest study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers conducted laboratory experiments which simulated clinical infusions of vitamin C on a range of nine cancer and four normal cells. In five of the cancer lines, there was a 50% decrease in cell survival, while normal cells were unaffected.

Vitamin C’s benefits are continually in question but one thing is for sure though, that eating a healthy, balanced diet, including plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, is an effective way to reduce the risk of getting cancer in the first place.

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The Benefits Of Vitamin C On The Aging Body

Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, is an essential micronutrient that our bodies need to make important protein building blocks, create energy and produce certain mood-enhancing brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. It also plays an important role as an antioxidant.

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Vitamin C….The Versatile Antioxidant Vitamin

Vitamin C as an antioxidant, helps reduce the activity of free radicals, by products of normal metabolism which nonetheless can damage cells and set the stage for aging, degeneration, and cancer. This article provides information on the many benefits of Vitamin C as an antioxidant.

Slice an apple into half, and it turns brown. A copper penny suddenly becomes green, or an iron nail when left outside, will rust. What do all these events have in common? These are examples of a process called oxidation. If the sliced apple is dipped in a lemon juice, however, the rate at which the apple turns brown is slowed. It is because the Vitamin C in the lemon juice slows the rate of oxidative damage.

Since its discovery 65 years ago, vitamin C has come to be known as a “wonder worker.” Because of its role in collagen formation and other life-sustaining functions, Vitamin C serves as a key immune system nutrient and a potent free-radical fighter. This double-duty nutrient has been shown to prevent many illnesses, from everyday ailments such as the common cold to devastating diseases such as cancer.

The water-soluble vitamin C is known in the scientific world as ascorbic acid, a term that actually means “without scurvy.” We depend on ascorbic acid for many aspects of our biochemical functioning; yet human beings are among only a handful of animal species that cannot produce their own supply of vitamin C. Like these other animals, including primates and guinea pigs, we have no choice but to obtain this nutrient through food or our daily diet.

Vitamin C can enhance the body’s resistance from different diseases, including infections and certain types of cancer. It strengthens and protects the immune system by stimulating the activity of antibodies and immune system cells such as phagocytes and neutrophils.

Vitamin C, as an antioxidant, helps reduce the activity of free radicals. Free radicals are by-products of normal metabolism which can damage cells and set the stage for aging, degeneration, and cancer. It shouldn’t come as any surprise that vitamin C is being used for cancer treatment. In large doses, Vitamin C is sometimes administered intravenously as part of cancer treatment.

Vitamin C prevents free radical damage in the lungs and may even help to protect the central nervous system from such damage. Free radicals are molecules with an unpaired electron. In this state, they’re highly reactive and destructive to everything that gets in their way. Although free radicals have been implicated in many diseases, they are actually a part of the body chemistry.

As an antioxidant, vitamin C’s primary role is to neutralize free radicals. Since ascorbic acid is water soluble, it can work both inside and outside the cells to combat free radical damage. Vitamin C is an excellent source of electrons; therefore, it “can donate electrons to free radicals such as hydroxyl and superoxide radicals and quench their reactivity.”

The versatile vitamin C also works along with glutathione peroxidase (a major free radical-fighting enzyme) to revitalize vitamin E, a fat-soluble antioxidant. In addition to its work as a direct scavenger of free radicals in fluids, then, vitamin C also contributes to the antioxidant activity in the lipids.

Optimal health, however, requires a balance between free radical generation and antioxidant protection. One of the functions of Vitamin C is to get and quench these free radicals before they create too much damage.

However, there is research to show that vitamin C may act as a pro-oxidant. In other words, vitamin C, under certain conditions anyway, may act in a manner that is opposite to its intended purpose. This has raised concern among thousands of people who supplement their diets with vitamin C…but that’s another story.

6 Proven Ways to Improve Your Health

An hour long webinar with Andrew Saul on Six Proven Ways to Improve Your Health. Also features a long Question and Answer section on Vitamin C, Niacin and much more.